In which we are not unaware, but not very worried about germs

We're headed out in about an hour to the Mt Adams Endurance Ride. 

With all of the brou-ha-ha about EHV-1, and the inevitable screaming of "WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE" in regards to a virus, I did a bunch of research and decided to go to the ride. 

Here's the statement from our head vet, Mike Foss DVM, about the EHV-1 risk this weekend:

There is some risk of your horses contracting EHV1. In most cases it is a very small risk. Keep in mind that diseases have cycles and we are simply in an active cycle for EHV at this time. We have had EHV1 outbreaks in the Mid Columbia area before and we will have them again. Right now the thing we should all do is minimize the spread of the current outbreak. Our biggest problem is the broad and rapid movement of horses in our region of the country. My advice to horse-owners in the Mid Columbia is as follows;


1. If you or your horse had any contact or even close proximity to any horse that was at the recent Cutting Horse event in Ogden Utah then please do all of us a favor and stay home and stay away from other horses until this outbreak is over. Contact your veterinarian to form a plan to monitor your horses and know when to seek help.


2. If your horse activities are not Western Performance then your risk of exposure is very small. If you are simply trail riding then your risk of disease is minimal. You can probably continue your normal activities. Simply be vigilant and follow common sense.
3. If you participate in Western Performance activities then you might just want to stay home until this outbreak is over.


4. If your horse is just staying at home then relax as there is very little risk of disease.


5. Stay informed. I will try to keep this website updated. As of today, May 18th @ 7 pm there is a confirmed case of EHV1 in Clackamas County. (That horse did go to the Cutting horse show in Utah.) The Mt Adams Endurance Ride is still on. Expect the horses will be subject to a physical examination including rectal temperature.


6. The signs I will get concerned about will be depression, a runny nose, a fever and/or a cough. Call me if your horse develops any of these signs.


For most of you your horse is more likely to get colic or a laceration than get EHV1 so do not forget to watch for the usual stuff.

With all that in mind, we're going.  Goals for the weekend (in reverse order of importance):  Finish Fiddle's 2nd 50-miler, have fun, stay safe. 

Wish us luck!

Comments

  1. See you later today, Aarene, thank you for spreading the "good" word. Education, not hysteria is the key. :)

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  2. Sensible advice - so far, based on what I've heard, all infected horses either were at the Utah event or came in contact with horses at the Utah event. I'm going to a three day clinic tomorrow - all of the horses except the clinicians' are from the local area, and his haven't been in contact with horses that have been infected or which might have been infected, so we should be OK.

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  3. Have a great time, and good for you not panicking!

    My situation is different, but expect as we get more info about it being contained in our community, things will go back to normal.
    I've heard all 54 horses known to be exposed at the cutting show are currently in quarantine.

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  4. We're heading out tomorrow morning! I loved this ride last year, awesome footing and scenery. See ya there.

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  5. If I lived in the midwest or lots of other areas I wouldn't be too concerned either. Here in Colorado we have had 10 horses quarantined - all within about 40 miles of me - and two have died.

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  6. We talked about this on the way out to ride at Mann Road yesterday... I had just spent the morning writing about EVH-1 and was following more or less the same reasoning as you. Be informed so you can make a rational decision and encourage others to be the same.

    As with any risk, individuals must decide for themselves, and I can't fault anyone who is opting out. Some people are dealing with multiple levels of responsibility that make their decision more complex.

    I hope you and Fee have a fantastic ride!

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  7. Staying aware and making responsible decisions seems way more reasonable than locking everyone in a closet until this passes.

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